Research

Transnationalism, Networks & Culture

A National Institute of Minority Health & Health Disparities-funded collaboration between Boston University, the University of Massachusetts at Boston, The Dominican Development Center, and the Brazilian Immigrant Center.

Culture is associated with both risk and protective factors related to health. For settled immigrants and transnationals, the influence of culture may vary depending on a range of factors at the individual, network and broader community levels. Currently, no metric exists to capture culture as a multi-level construct and its effects on health among immigrants. Through a range of mixed-methods data collection methods and a series of planning charrettes, we will explore the influence of culture on health beliefs and practices among Brazilian and Dominican immigrants. Our aim is to develop an interdisciplinary approach to trace and measure the relationship between culture and health.

The specific goals of this project are to:

  • Establish an interdisciplinary planning committee consisting of researchers from the social and health sciences, arts, and humanities, as well as stakeholders from the Boston area Brazilian and Dominican communities.
  • Through a series of charrettes, engage the planning committee in critical dialogues exploring conceptualizations of culture at the individual, network and community levels and its relationship to transnationalism. The dialogues will also cover health beliefs and practices among Dominicans and Brazilians in the greater Boston area.
  • Pilot, evaluate and disseminate a multi-level participatory approach to examining the relationship between culture and health beliefs and practices for the development of a full-scale study.

Learn more about Project Aquila.

Multiculturalism, Networks & STEM Participation

This National Science Foundation-funded 3-year study aims to:

—1) Refine the conceptualization and measurement of multicultural identity (aka ethnic flexibility)

—2) Examine specific interactions between multicultural identity and STEM skills as correlates of STEM persistence.

—STEM Skills: Adaptability & resilience, creative & innovative problem-solving, and cross-cultural communication. —We predict that multiculturalism will be associated with these key STEM skills.

—Our central hypothesis is that URM students who persist in STEM studies beyond the first academic year will be more likely to be multicultural than students who drop out of STEM studies.

Interests

  • Ethnic Flexibility
  • Diversity & Innovation
  • Transnationalism & health
  • Social networks & identity
  • Diversity, Science & Technology

Multiculturalism & STEM Research Team

Adán Colón-Carmona

Adán Colón-Carmona

Co-PI

External Link
Alvine Sangang

Alvine Sangang

Graduate Research Assistant (PhD student)

Michael Walker

Graduate Research Assistant (PhD student)

Alessandra Bazo Vienrich

Alessandra Bazo Vienrich

Graduate Research Assistant (PhD student)

External link
Thary Lim

Thary Lim

Graduate Research Assistant (MS student)

Nicole Young

Nicole Young

Graduate Research Assistant (MS student)

an interdisciplinary team.

Our research team – which includes both undergraduate and graduate research assistants – brings together knowledge and skills from a range of fields. Our graduate RAs are enrolled in Public Policy; Transnational, Cultural & Community Studies; Sociology, and Higher Education. Our undergraduate RAs include majors in anthropology, biology, women’s studies, and economics.